Archive

Posts Tagged ‘parent’

How to blow your first parent teacher conference?

The idea of preparing for a parent teacher conference or any new birth of parent relationships should begin long before actual face-to-face contact with a child’s teacher is established. Parents in concept are the first and primary teacher in a student’s life so don’t become one of my colleagues that two-steps without their key cohort on the dance floor.

One of the most valuable tips for engaging your student’s parent(s) before conference is to establish a non-biased relationship and well-prepared conference prior to meeting them on cookie and juice night. I set a goal each semester to contact each parent or guardian with positive reports at least twice before dropping the F bomb let alone before meeting them in person.

You will do everyone a big service by researching the family and community [if unfamiliar] prior to what I call the interview. There’s nothing worst than getting a name wrong or assuming we all share the same cultural beliefs. So do your homework, do your homework, do your homework.

One thing I learned early on was to maintain high expectations for my students and their parents. Regardless to how things appear and develop, staying focused on high expectations trumps all other methods of taking point on the war against apathy.

For your convenience I have listed a few post to help with successful parent teacher conferences:

7 Steps to Becoming an Effective Teacher

Why is it so difficult to contact my student’s parents?

Five Simple Steps to Making That Call Home to Parents

Create a floor plan that flows from your classroom door.

Actions to take for having your best year teaching in 2010

Stay focused. Stay confident and you’ll blow wind in your sails!

Your Best Year Teaching: If you have been inspired from this article please consider leaving a comment and subscribing to the RSS feed (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader. Please send your friends to http://laroncarter.com to connect with me or @laroncarter on Twitter.

Stepping outside the bubble to network your kid’s venture


The Internet brings valuable information and worldwide presence to our doorstep. With the development of web 2.0 an era of abundance was ushered into our computers filled with free stuff. That is what Twitter friend Alejandro Reyes (@alejandroreyes) calls insane content value. Web tools filled with how to information can bake up tasty social media networking opportunities for you and your kidpreneur with little to no money down.

Get familiar with how networking works.

Although there are literally unlimited web tools available to everyone online, those tools are used differently by web learners. And quite frankly, many social media communities afford members networking potential only limited to the users creativity. Provided members of these communities follow appropriate social media etiquette, the popularly used platforms are buzzing with all sorts of people sharing information, products, and services. I recommend starting slow at first. Join kidpreneur groups on Facebook like Raising CEO Kids and Linkedin’s Ypulse Networking For Youth Media & Marketing Professionals. Then connect and engage the discussions. Review this post for tips on how to enter a social media conversation. Although it’s teacher specific you’ll get the idea.

Seek to develop a network of wise counsel for doing big things.

Once settled in as a member on a site spend time adding friends and following their content in forum discussions before jumping into someone’s conversation. Taking time to introduce your self makes for a smoother transition into the community. Feel free to ask any specific questions you may have about using social media for effective networking.

Stay focused, stay confident, and meet-up with social media.

Kids Mind Your Own Business is loaded with tips of how parents can assist their children in growing their character and business with new school strategies and old school values. If you have been inspired from this article please leave a comment and consider subscribing to the RSS (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader [look for Weekend Post].

How to inspire Dads to do the Daddy thing?

Photo Credit by cogdogblog.

Research doesn’t have to report that students perform better and achieve academic success when fathers get more involved with their children’s education to know it’s a fact, do we? Nor, do you need someone to encourage you to forge a campaign for parent involvement before you get creative and start making things happen in your K-12 classroom.

K – 12 Education: Stressed Out Series 6.4

I don’t know if it’s just me being a male teacher or what, but I get excited when I see another man in the building (maybe not in the same way you do). It’s cool to watch students behaviors shift with each step taken by dads in the hallways. Like you I am more than prepared for lunchroom challenges, but we appreciate the reinforcement even if it is temporary on any given day.

Consider creating a campaign for building your network of male parents and guardians. In addition to fathers we’re talking big brothers (paternal and United Way), uncles, grandfathers, and significant others listed on your parent contact sheets. Your cause could be to form an advisory committee for best disciplinary practices to necktie donations and knot training classes on how to use one for an upcoming school celebration. If you are really gutsy make a difference by soliciting nominees for outstanding daddy.

You can write a district wide press release even if you only get one or two nominated dads to honor. Find a business to sponsor juice and snacks for a field trip of the dads to be invited. You can even do an interview by phone to launch that first podcast you’ve been putting off (see page 37 of my eBook for details). Don’t you think that ought to get them inspired?

P.S. If you have been inspired from this article please consider leaving a comment and subscribing to the RSS feed (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader. Please send your friends to http://laroncarter.com to connect with me or @laroncarter on Twitter.

Where do I start teaching my child about making money?


One of the first things you can do to help your children learn about making money is to model for them how to make a difference, says Twitter friend @Daveanderson100. You ask, “How does that help my child to learn about making money?” It’s simple, teaching by example to make a difference, starting in areas that interest you most, sets an important standard in your child’s character for learning how to add value of undeniable products or services that keep improving over time.


Undeniable products and services are in high demand.

Once a child grabs hold of an idea at its core there’s an innate ability for them to surpass their peers while they are still young. How many times have you said, “I wish I had learned that when I was younger.” Why is that? We understand that learning success secrets while our natural bend is still supple leverages success a lot quicker than when we are older.

Get paid for what you bring to the table.

Your child will learn early that by being the very best they can be helps them become better performers as they grow. Eventually your child will develop a hunger for out performing their previous performance. Then before they know it, they are out performing others without consciously competing. That kind of performance leads to peak performance, which carries a premium dollar amount for others to bid on. How’s that for starters?

Stay focused, stay confident, and bid high on peak performers,
Carter | @laroncarter

P.S. Kids Mind Your Own Business is loaded with tips of how parents can help their children build business skills with little to no money down. If you have been inspired from this article please leave a comment and consider subscribing to the RSS (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader [look for Weekend Post].

7 Steps to Becoming an Effective Teacher

Photo Credit by Just Me

You’ve gone to school, graduated from the college of education, hopefully negotiated more than what they offered you on the union negotiated step level contract, and now you are learning that teaching in K-12 environments aren’t the same classrooms you sat in as a kid. Here are some tips for acquiring effective teacher skill sets so you can reduce the stress and begin teaching with more confidence.


STEP 1

Get you hands on valuable information available from student CA-60 background folders. Documents like IEP’s and medical records provide a snap shot into the student’s academic story as a valuable first source for gathering information. A pit stop to the office several times a week on the way to planning hour or lunch can pay big dividends. You’re a pro, so tap the most obvious info resources before forming a misinformed hypothesis.

STEP 2
Gather current contact information of parents and guardians. You might want to include cell numbers of big brothers and sisters (both siblings and from United Way mentors). Be sure to note phone service carriers, off peak times, and texting plans so that you don’t get screened out unnecessarily. Research shows that many families are more likely to use cell phones as primary phone lines for calling contacts and Internet use so add primary email addresses in your contact list as needed.

STEP 3
Create well-written icebreaker activities. Loosening up the atmosphere not only gets your students connected to each other, but also gives you a starting point for valuable organized intel on your little darlings. Discovering whether a student has a favorite pet that’s sick or has been moving around a lot because of complicated family circumstances will help you more clearly identify classroom problems and develop “how to” solutions.

STEP 4
Do a walk around. The wonderful thing about venturing out into the neighborhoods of your school and meeting the people who live there and work in the retail stores, repair shops, and laundry mats is it gives you an understanding of its culture. You will also find out what works for the community as well as the problems needing to be fixed. Information from the pulse of a community, at ground level, helps to better understand outside issues brought into your classroom.

STEP 5
Make it a rule to contact each parent on your roster at least twice with heart felt positive reports before having to rat a student out. Parents that get regular negative calls from school personnel are a little punchy when seeing the call come in on caller ID. By establishing a genuine service connection with parents, based on trust and credibility, you can easily recruit them as part of your classroom management and support team member for special events.

STEP 6
Create a phone list of highly qualified substitute teachers [from colleagues and secretaries] that are capable of handling your students while you are away from the classroom. Substitutes will always have their work cut out for them, but some will have skill sets that return your students back in one piece and on task to pick up where you left off.

STEP 7
Teach your students to respect substitute teachers before you need to call one in to teach. You may not need a sub often, but incorporating a plan instructing students of proper etiquette practices and consequences establishes standards in your absence that will praise or reprimand behaviors upon your return. The best substitute teachers will want to teach for you if they know you have set them up to succeed.

P.S. If you have been inspired from this article please consider leaving a comment and subscribing to the RSS feed (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader. Please send your friends to http://laroncarter.com to connect with me or @laroncarter on Twitter.

Confident Teaching | Be Encouraged Mothers

LaRon Carter Mothers Day“A man loves his sweetheart the most, his wife the best, but his mother the longest.” Irish Proverb

Stressed Out K – 12 Education Series 3.3

Be Encouraged

My mother, Winifred E. Carter, is my shero. For three quarters of my life she has been a phenomenal single mother and guiding light in my life. Watching her strength and ability to endure all of our challenges has had big influence on how and why I do what I do. Be encouraged momma. You deserve the very best that life has to offer and I will do everything within my power of faith in God to channel your blessings. And I know one of those blessings you desire is to be a blessing to others. So, I write today in honor of you to all the single mothers born to teach their children.

Get Confident

For a new teacher teaching in it self soon becomes overwhelming. Each young professional new to the art has his or her own set of variables that factor into their learning and teaching experiences. The purpose of the Confident Teaching Category is to make a serious connection between the things you want to know about reducing stress within the difficult task of solving classroom problems whether at work or at home. Your confidence will take a bold stance to assure your boss, your students, and yourself that you “Got This” once settled in clearly identifying the problems, develop effective action plans, and monitor your results for staying on course.

Go Deep

While working through the writing challenges of this Stressed Out K – 12 EDU Series I’ve had to navigate through extraordinary life hardships. All of which have built my faith upon the things I hope for. Becoming all that God has created me to be is no small task, nor is it for you. And this is why. Once you set a goal that is bigger than you and attach high standards of operating along the way, all hell will come against your good pursuit. Like a football wide receiver I have to go deep in order to give my best everyday. You can do no less for those you serve day in and day out. They need you to go deep. Whether it’s in the classroom, at home, or in your place of worship, stay focused and stay confident. Let your phenomenal shine, it’s your day, it’s your time. And by the way, Happy Mother’s Day!

As always please comment and share. Are there any words of wisdom my mature mothers can pass on to young mothers or mothers to be?

This is a new series called Stressed Out K – 12 Education. Over the next several weeks we will explore classroom issues surrounding special needs, at-risk behaviors, student – teacher and teacher – parent relationships, and much more as it relates to reducing stress created from educational systems, narrow minded thinking of difficult colleagues, and the headaches from someone else’s undisciplined kids.

P.S. If you have been inspired from this article please consider leaving a comment and subscribing to the RSS feed (just below this article) to have future articles delivered to your feed reader.

Then encourage family and friends by sharing this blog address and invite others to subscribe so we get a chance to connect as well. Just send them to https://laroncarter.wordpress.com where they can bookmark or subscribe to the page. Feel free to direct message me on Twitter @laroncarter and @K12Live or connect on http://laroncarter.com.

Copyright © 2009 | LaRon A. Carter “The Guest Teacher

K12 Live | Spotlight on Success

The Facebook Group That Tweets Out On Friday's #K12Live

The Facebook Group That Tweets Out On Friday's #K12Live

“Faith is the courage to face reality with hope.” Dr. Robert H. Schuller

Tweet Out Friday #K12Live

The Launch of K12 Live on Facebook

K12 Live is a web community based movement that spotlights some of the brightest teacher’s you know, discovered, or read about the outstanding methods and systems they use to produce win-win results for the students they serve.

Here’s how it works:

► Join the group and let us know why you do what you do? Why did you choose to work in education? Why did you choose your specialized area? Why did you choose your students or did you? You get the idea.

► Then each Thursday or Friday come back and post a spotlight of outstanding K – 12 school employees or parents you work with, it could be someone you recently discovered or never forgot about how they impacted your life as a teacher.

► You can link us to a video (highly recommended) of your spotlight recognition. You can point us to a blog or podcast that tells a success story that might inspire others in education to grow beyond the day-to-day challenges that destroys careers and smashes a student’s passion to dream.

► Then give them a Tweet Out. Let the entire micro blogosphere know in 140 character spaces that person is a shinning planet in your universe. Encourage others to follow them if they’re on http://twitter.com using the hash tag #K12Live so everyone can read about them at http://search.twitter.com/search?q=k12live under search tag.

Ex. @kchichester rocks the chalkboard inspiring her students to dream big American dreams and never loose hope! http://twurl.nl/2kvitu #K12Live

Ex. @lnicewaner is blogging about the creative solutions of technology in the classroom, she gets it http://twurl.nl/4w5wqd. #K12Live

Ex. @deployedteacher wants you to check out @dogtagsforkids for sending kids dogtags from their parents overseas. Great pride at school #K12Live

► Finally pass this link around to your family and friends so that they can join in on the fun of being celebrated for the hard work they love to do. And courage them to connect with others from this group. Support may be one of the most valuable keys to managing life’s challenges. Post it and watch it go down at http://search.twitter.com/search?q=k12live under search tag.

P.S. If you have been inspired from this article please consider leaving a comment and subscribing to the RSS feed (just below this article) to have future articles delivered to your feed reader.

Then encourage family and friends by sharing this blog address and invite others to subscribe so we get a chance to connect as well. Just send them to https://laroncarter.wordpress.com where they can bookmark or subscribe to the page. Feel free to direct message me on Twitter @laroncarter or connect on http://laroncarter.com

Copyright © 2009 | LaRon A. Carter “The Guest Teacher