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Posts Tagged ‘Facebook’

LiLTweeks: Guaranteed social media success worth following.

The lesson I learned this week [LiLTweeks] came from observations around my most favorite social media superstars getting all the blogger buzz, Twitter re-tweets and reply’s, and profile status update comments on Facebook. It’s enough to make a want-a-be enthusiast jealous for attention with all the wrong motives.

Popularity listings worth modeling

Most of us have seen the Twitter users with 1,856,000 followers tweeting random mental gushes of what’s happening in their world of fame and fortune. Now and then there are famous people I’ve managed to sneak in a confirmed Facebook friend request before they reached 5K and move to the overflowing Like Page, if that’s even possible post Oprah’s social media jump. But few of them connect back with us like Paulo Coehlo or Mari Smith. Then there are my above average Facebook friends (Ty Adams) that earn special celebrity status within our community because they post great content that gets many more comments and likes than most of us do.

Stop it right now

Have you noticed people creating problems for themselves trying to win social media popularity contest in an effort to get the most comment replies? I’ve been guilty of posting favorite quotes to the point of plain intellectual laziness myself. I suppose it’s a learning process. Every now and then one of my friends will rant about witnessing spiritual campaigns people launch to convince the world of fake “I’m living holy” status updates backed by bible scriptures to get attention. Word to the wise, “If that’s you stop it?”

Just be a friend

I know a few of my friends will wonder if I’m talking about them so let me set the record straight right now. None of my friends behave that way. That is you don’t behave that way without me eventually telling you about yourself. I expect to be treated the same and have been in the past. That’s what friends do. Friends don’t let friends faux tweet or falsify status updates. From one friend to another, being a friend is about doing something good for others like showing them you care. That’s all. Just list your friends and follow them to the point of ensuring their confidence in you being there. Making friends smile when they need it most guarantees social media success to the point of following you back and maybe even buying your stuff.

Stay focused. Stay confident, keep posting valuable content, and you will be followed.

LiLTweeks (Lessons I Learned This Week) is a weekly observation of some problems I’ve encountered and possible actions for resolve. If you have been inspired from this article please leave a comment and consider subscribing to the RSS (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader [look for Weekend Post].

LiLTweeks: Have your status updates gone uncommented?


The lesson I learned this week [LiLTweeks] came about after realizing my Facebook account’s privacy setting preference for personal information and posts was custom set to [be seen by] “Only Me” for over three months. The setting change happened shortly after Facebook made those privacy control changes for user posts on its platform. I continuously posted links to great online content, funny quotes, inspirational messages, and labor intense notes the whole time. Week after week numerous news updates without one comment response.

Technical difficulties are correctable.

You’ve heard of the term technical difficulties right? There are quite a few book titles on the subject. Facebook friend and The Bond Institute’s Audacity Expert and life coach Tonoa Bond (@tonoabond) even offers her thoughts on the idea in a free eBook. But what I discovered is that my Facebook technical difficulties were an extension of a much bigger life issue.

Do you know someone like this?

From lacking clearly defined goals, to depression, to self-sabotage, there are many reasons for not living your dreams. But this LiLTweek is focused on the “Only Me” button. Perhaps you know someone that feels like no matter how hard they try they just aren’t able to produce positive results. Maybe they feel like nobody out there cares about them or what they have to say. Have you ever felt alone in a room full of people?

Don’t worry about everyone else.

Facebook friend and @websuccessdiva Maria Reyes McDavis and I were discussing her inspirational Proverbs 31 Project (scheduled to launch June 1, 2010). And she mentioned, “I just speak out what I need to hear myself sometimes. . .” Reminds me of a pastor preaching, “Don’t worry about whose not here in church hearing this message. The lesson is for you and me to learn, right here, right now.”

Breathe. Relax. Re-focus on the solution.

Investigating my Facebook problem revealed a solution. And I repeatedly changed the preference every few weeks or so. Mysteriously the preference changed back like a default to “Only Me.” I’m not sure what that was all about, but the bigger lesson learned is that if the only me button is activated in your life there won’t be any connections, comments, or relations, let alone friends. Socially speaking if you feel me.

LiLTweeks (Lessons I Learned This Week) is a weekly observation of some problems I’ve encountered and possible actions for resolve. If you have been inspired from this article please leave a comment and consider subscribing to the RSS (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader [look for Weekend Post].

LilTweeks: Facebook Rave, Rut, or Roam Part 2



Continued from previous weekend post.

The second Facebook lesson I learned this week [LiLTweeks] came when I was trying to jump into a mini rave happening on one of my old friend’s status update questions. You know the ones that bait you into commenting for the sake of discretely engaging support on a personal issue, but the comment thread takes on a life of its own, yeah, that one.

The discussion was already 10 minutes in by the time I posted my first comment, even then I had two or three comments in between my update and the last time I saw the live feed, which sort of looks like a chatroom thread because the conversation looses its linear continuity and can be slightly confusing. At least for a guy lacking multiple simultaneous conversation skills like me.

There lies the problem, because, the dialog gets out of sequence like a third text message that is read before the second one posted because both of you are typing so fast in between taking a few seconds to think.

The feeds were pouring in and I could see the commentator getting frustrated because his FB (Facebook) friends weren’t playing by his rules of engagement. People were trying their best to understand his original question before jumping into a potentially emotional topic and the moderator took it as an avoidance tactic, which I didn’t understand (people were in the conversation and trying to speak out). Others were making effort to contribute in ways they best understood the content, which as you know can take FB conversation treads into uncharted territory.

From it, I walked away realizing that rather than getting stressed over a thread [or content] not producing the results hoped for, allowing social media to be organic has tremendous value in a supplemental sort of way. Maybe it’s best to post, try your best to keep the feed live, be the best spokesman you can be for yourself, and let the power of the written word live on its own while you wonder over to another conversation on the other side of the room without having to actually say, “It’s a joke.”

Wow! Time fly’s. Lets bounce over to the Motherland and see if we can catch Tevin Campbell before loosing my WiFi.

“Faceboo Rave, Rut, or Roam Part 1” can be found here.

Stay focused. Stay confident, live a little, and love even more,
Carter | @laroncarter

P.S. LiLTweeks is a weekly observation of some problems I’ve encountered and possible actions for resolve. If you have been inspired from this article please leave a comment and consider subscribing to the RSS (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader [look for Weekend Post].

LiLTweeks: Facebook Rave, Rut, or Roam Part 1

Do we really have the luxury of allowing social media connections [named friends] dictate how we express our core values?

The lesson I learned this week [LiLTweeks] was developed between two Facebook feeds. First, one of my celebrity friends posted a passionately well-written Note (Get excited with me about being able to leverage Facebook and Twitter for getting around office secretaries to make some amazing personal connections).

I wasn’t familiar with the incident he wrote about, but I did recognize his range of emotions expressed in the text and they were heated. This was one of those social media threads you follow from the bleachers because you’re either not part of the sub-community or you couldn’t speak intelligently on the subject without doing some background investigation at the expense of sounding like the dog ate your homework.

Both celebrity and content created a mini rave for his Note (more than 35 individual comments in minutes) and the discussion was bringing out the best and worst in participants. But, the problem I had didn’t occur until one or two of those emotionally driven comments triggered my man [and I say that sincerely] to anguish over how he might have offended someone or had been misunderstood to the point of posting a revised version of an already well-written op-ed.

Now, I’m hardly a savvy PR guy or a seasoned English major for that matter. I didn’t read above sixth grade level until nearly thirty years old. So I don’t claim to professionally understand how content, celebrity, and spin work together for creating a worldwide rave. But, you better believe I’ve been around the block enough to know when I see a bully and how to deal with them. Note, my actions taken seem to be under ongoing construction, however, the foundation of taking a stance to defend my core values do not have the luxury of allowing social media connections dictate how I express them, especially if I have labored over my content long and hard enough to have modeled an officer and gentleman’s temperance within my original publication, they’re too valuable.

Look at the time. We can still make it over to Vegas and crash another social media party before the Internet shuts down. (To be continued)

Stay focused. Stay confident, live a little, and love a lot,
Carter | @laroncarter

P.S. LiLTweeks is a weekly observation of some problems I’ve encountered and possible actions for resolve. If you have been inspired from this article please leave a comment and consider subscribing to the RSS (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader [look for Weekend Post].