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The most valuable ingredient to give your child’s business.

Goal setting and planning are very high on my list of standards for running anything successful. Yet, all of my dreams and desires weigh priceless without adding one particular ingredient to grow my success. Without this additive to your kidpreneur’s toolbox of business weapons they may never fully understand how to take off from the starter blocks. But with this one nourishing supplement they can travel further than the competition in one single leap.

Teach you child to take action.

Kids have a huge advantage over adults for many reasons. They “should” have more energy, not be prone to life failures that have suffocated our resiliency, and they just do things without thinking through what might go wrong.

OK, that last one can keep us from making some rather big mistakes. But it can also hinder a business owner from taking needed action to get out ahead of the competition or start something that can cause a revolution before someone else thinks it into action first.

In my eBook, A Guide to Your Best Year Teaching, I cover a section on Action Based Goals (SCR V2.6) that uniquely looks at how the teacher can be a change agent in their community by using social media clients that are designed to make taking action an event without excuse.

Teaching your kid CEO to take action is probably the least expensive deterrent for them developing procrastinating behaviors.

Children learn on individual learning curves, but one thing we know for sure is that procrastination is developed out of fear and the best way to teach them differently is to teach taking fearless action without delay.

Stay focused, stay confident, and teach yours to take action.

Kids Mind Your Own Business is loaded with tips of how parents can assist their children in growing their character and business with new school strategies and old school values. If you have been inspired from this article please leave a comment and consider subscribing to the RSS (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader [look for Weekend Post].

Stepping outside the bubble to network your kid’s venture


The Internet brings valuable information and worldwide presence to our doorstep. With the development of web 2.0 an era of abundance was ushered into our computers filled with free stuff. That is what Twitter friend Alejandro Reyes (@alejandroreyes) calls insane content value. Web tools filled with how to information can bake up tasty social media networking opportunities for you and your kidpreneur with little to no money down.

Get familiar with how networking works.

Although there are literally unlimited web tools available to everyone online, those tools are used differently by web learners. And quite frankly, many social media communities afford members networking potential only limited to the users creativity. Provided members of these communities follow appropriate social media etiquette, the popularly used platforms are buzzing with all sorts of people sharing information, products, and services. I recommend starting slow at first. Join kidpreneur groups on Facebook like Raising CEO Kids and Linkedin’s Ypulse Networking For Youth Media & Marketing Professionals. Then connect and engage the discussions. Review this post for tips on how to enter a social media conversation. Although it’s teacher specific you’ll get the idea.

Seek to develop a network of wise counsel for doing big things.

Once settled in as a member on a site spend time adding friends and following their content in forum discussions before jumping into someone’s conversation. Taking time to introduce your self makes for a smoother transition into the community. Feel free to ask any specific questions you may have about using social media for effective networking.

Stay focused, stay confident, and meet-up with social media.

Kids Mind Your Own Business is loaded with tips of how parents can assist their children in growing their character and business with new school strategies and old school values. If you have been inspired from this article please leave a comment and consider subscribing to the RSS (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader [look for Weekend Post].

Developing foundational skill sets and networks for kids


My child’s got talent enough to win any competition.

The fundamental difference between talents and skills are very clear and can be costly. So, how do we manage to miss the mark when it comes to helping our kids maximize their talents for the big pay offs? Normally, parents get caught up in identifying a special talent in their child and quickly move into competitive exploitation. Now, if this message is not for you, it’s not for you.


Natural ability is a good place to start.

As a teacher and coach, I get a chance to see a lot of truly talented artist, athletes, and performers. Already, this year, I’ve witnessed a gifted student’s career warped from having been thrust into the spotlight way to soon. A mother spent several thousands of dollars she didn’t have on fees, travel, and lodging to have her daughter compete with peers that had spent endless hours being coached before entering a competition of that level. The result was utter devastation for the unprepared child and unnecessary financial stress on the family.

Skill is created from training.

Those young competitors had honed their skills over time. Even though many weren’t as talented as my friend’s child, their performances out shined the newcomer, because their parents found it wiser to spend time and money on developing a foundation first. Their child’s up front investment on the practice court yielded higher dividends in the backcourt. 50 Cent, referring to his new book The 50th Law with Robert Greene, says that many artist miss their chance to grow valid careers, because, they want to take him on in battle before they have developed their craft.

Don’t bet a dollar on your kid’s talent, if they’ve only got half the skills. The cost is more than you both can afford.

Stay focused, stay confident, and work those skills.

Kids Mind Your Own Business is loaded with tips of how parents can help their children build business skills with little to no money down. If you have been inspired from this article please leave a comment and consider subscribing to the RSS (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader [look for Weekend Post]. Connect with me @laroncarter on Twitter.

Nurturing creative money making ideas in your kids.


My kid has a crazy sensation to . . . But, I don’t know?

Does your child have non-traditional pursuits of interest? It doesn’t have to be odd interest like collecting all those single socks that come up missing in the laundry for some unknown ongoing school project. His thing could be something you don’t have an interest in, nor, do you believe it’s worth sacrificing for, like editing digital photography or developing gaming programs.

Don’t be a dream crusher.

When was the last time you told a close friend, you wished your parents would have supported your dream to pursue what you were crazy about doing as a kid? Ever wonder how your life would be different if someone had blown wind into your sails? I’m still trying to get past some of my childhood dream crushers, so I don’t wind up saying one day, “If only I had been courageous enough to write my first script or shoot my own short film?”

Be creative with funding your child’s interest.

Cortlan Wickliff, a 19-year-old inventor and senior at Rice University, recently organized a youth camp to teach kids about math and science. All inspired from him following his mother to her college classes because it was less expensive than paying for childcare. He says his mother didn’t buy him the newest Jordan’s, but she did spend $300 to get him on a plane so he could see the world.

Maybe you’re raising the next tech savvy entrepreneur like Ephren W. Taylor II the youngest African-American CEO of any publicly traded company ever—City Capital Corporation (OTCBB:CTCC) runs a multi-million dollar technology enterprise. His parents were moderately creative in funding his interest to play video games. They told him that in order for him to play video games he would have to create his own. The rest is his-story. What’s yours?

Stay focused, stay confident, and blow wind in his sails.

Kids Mind Your Own Business is loaded with tips of how parents can help their children build business skills with little to no money down. If you have been inspired from this article please leave a comment and consider subscribing to the RSS (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader [look for Weekend Post]. Connect with me @laroncarter on Twitter.

Where do I start teaching my child about making money?


One of the first things you can do to help your children learn about making money is to model for them how to make a difference, says Twitter friend @Daveanderson100. You ask, “How does that help my child to learn about making money?” It’s simple, teaching by example to make a difference, starting in areas that interest you most, sets an important standard in your child’s character for learning how to add value of undeniable products or services that keep improving over time.


Undeniable products and services are in high demand.

Once a child grabs hold of an idea at its core there’s an innate ability for them to surpass their peers while they are still young. How many times have you said, “I wish I had learned that when I was younger.” Why is that? We understand that learning success secrets while our natural bend is still supple leverages success a lot quicker than when we are older.

Get paid for what you bring to the table.

Your child will learn early that by being the very best they can be helps them become better performers as they grow. Eventually your child will develop a hunger for out performing their previous performance. Then before they know it, they are out performing others without consciously competing. That kind of performance leads to peak performance, which carries a premium dollar amount for others to bid on. How’s that for starters?

Stay focused, stay confident, and bid high on peak performers,
Carter | @laroncarter

P.S. Kids Mind Your Own Business is loaded with tips of how parents can help their children build business skills with little to no money down. If you have been inspired from this article please leave a comment and consider subscribing to the RSS (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader [look for Weekend Post].