Archive

Archive for February, 2010

LiLTweeks: The Philosophy of Winning, Part 1



“True character in a winner is not boiled down to one event or situation. Winners are made of the stuff that can get back up, dust off the dirt, wipe away the tears, ignore the stinky smell you’ve stepped into, and focus through the pain with confidence to perform better next time the whistle blows.”

(Note: Philosophy of Winning is an excerpt from soon to be published Special Report on Winning)

Winning or even being a winner means something different to just about anyone you ask to share their thoughts on the subject. Straight talk on it is, even though many of us buy into what others think it means to be a winner, what you personally believe and how you feel about it is what brings out the champion in you.

Believe you are a winner, even when no one else does.

Say it like you mean it, “I’m a winner and there’s nothing you can do about it.” What does that feel like? In high school I was part of a group of guys called Hard, Inc. We were cut from a unique breed of athletes, walking around chanting how fine we were, long before MC Hammer wrote, “Can’t Touch This.”

My grandmother would often tell me, “It’s not always what you say, but how you say it, that wins friends and creates enemies.” Before long I learned that you can look at competition the same way. Nana could have easily said, “It’s not the win or loss that matters, but how you played the game, that makes you a winner?” (To be continued. . . )

LiLTweeks (Lessons I Learned This Week) is a weekly observation of some problems I’ve encountered and possible actions for resolve. If you have been inspired from this article please leave a comment and consider subscribing to the RSS (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader [look for Weekend Post].

Advertisements

How to inspire Dads to do the Daddy thing?

Photo Credit by cogdogblog.

Research doesn’t have to report that students perform better and achieve academic success when fathers get more involved with their children’s education to know it’s a fact, do we? Nor, do you need someone to encourage you to forge a campaign for parent involvement before you get creative and start making things happen in your K-12 classroom.

K – 12 Education: Stressed Out Series 6.4

I don’t know if it’s just me being a male teacher or what, but I get excited when I see another man in the building (maybe not in the same way you do). It’s cool to watch students behaviors shift with each step taken by dads in the hallways. Like you I am more than prepared for lunchroom challenges, but we appreciate the reinforcement even if it is temporary on any given day.

Consider creating a campaign for building your network of male parents and guardians. In addition to fathers we’re talking big brothers (paternal and United Way), uncles, grandfathers, and significant others listed on your parent contact sheets. Your cause could be to form an advisory committee for best disciplinary practices to necktie donations and knot training classes on how to use one for an upcoming school celebration. If you are really gutsy make a difference by soliciting nominees for outstanding daddy.

You can write a district wide press release even if you only get one or two nominated dads to honor. Find a business to sponsor juice and snacks for a field trip of the dads to be invited. You can even do an interview by phone to launch that first podcast you’ve been putting off (see page 37 of my eBook for details). Don’t you think that ought to get them inspired?

P.S. If you have been inspired from this article please consider leaving a comment and subscribing to the RSS feed (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader. Please send your friends to http://laroncarter.com to connect with me or @laroncarter on Twitter.

LiLTweeks: From Author Paulo Coelho of The Alchemist


The Internet is loaded with gems archived in queue and ready to shine enormous amounts of light onto any corner of your mind you dare to discover.

Wisdom by Will

At the bottom of Annie Hart’s blog is a Youtube video titled Will’s Wisdom by TheMindGuru I hadn’t seen it, but you may have on one link or another. There was this one clip I remember of Will Smith’s interview with Tavis Smiley where he mentioned The Alchemist having been his favorite book. Some how author Paulo Coelho got bumped from my reading list over the years. I saw the video as a good omen and promptly went out and picked up and read The Alchemist.

I tend to do some sort of research on every project I undertake. This time a Google search landed me on a Harper-Collins’ 2008 Blogtalkradio podcast of both Paulo Coelho and the new film project’s director and actor Laurence Fishburne.

Worth every bit of Paulo press

Rather than elaborate on an iconic novel that has been translated in more languages than any other living authors book, I’ll share some of the most interesting highlights and comparisons made while listening to the radio show. I believe these lessons from Paulo will encourage someone thinking of starting a new career later in life. The discouraged author will find renewed drive for his passion. And if you feel like you are loosing everything [including your mind] you will find hope in Paulo’s story. Like millions of others, I was inspired by Santiago’s journey and thought I’d introduce his author to you.

• Published in over 60 languages, distributed in 150 countries, over 100 million sold.
• He started a new career writing his first book at 40, The Pilgrimage.
• The Alchemist was a metaphor of why it took so long to write his first book.
• Paulo came up with the title first. He said it came to him before knowing what he would write about.
• The Alchemist was considered no good and turned down at first.
• The book sold only two books the first month and a mere 900 the first year.
• Paulo was committed insane before writing the book.
• He was homeless and lived through much adversity.
• Completed several books that never made it to the press because he didn’t feel they deserved to.
• Values all his published works as equals because he has given his all to each project.
• Paulo says the book is successful because the reader likes it and tells someone else, not because of anything special the publisher is doing.

What’s really holding you back from making it happen?

Stay focused. Stay confident. Be bold and publish magical stories,
Carter | @laroncarter

LiLTweeks (Lessons I Learned This Week) is a weekly observation of some problems I’ve encountered and possible actions for resolve. If you have been inspired from this article please leave a comment and consider subscribing to the RSS (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader [look for Weekend Post].

Where do I start teaching my child about making money?


One of the first things you can do to help your children learn about making money is to model for them how to make a difference, says Twitter friend @Daveanderson100. You ask, “How does that help my child to learn about making money?” It’s simple, teaching by example to make a difference, starting in areas that interest you most, sets an important standard in your child’s character for learning how to add value of undeniable products or services that keep improving over time.


Undeniable products and services are in high demand.

Once a child grabs hold of an idea at its core there’s an innate ability for them to surpass their peers while they are still young. How many times have you said, “I wish I had learned that when I was younger.” Why is that? We understand that learning success secrets while our natural bend is still supple leverages success a lot quicker than when we are older.

Get paid for what you bring to the table.

Your child will learn early that by being the very best they can be helps them become better performers as they grow. Eventually your child will develop a hunger for out performing their previous performance. Then before they know it, they are out performing others without consciously competing. That kind of performance leads to peak performance, which carries a premium dollar amount for others to bid on. How’s that for starters?

Stay focused, stay confident, and bid high on peak performers,
Carter | @laroncarter

P.S. Kids Mind Your Own Business is loaded with tips of how parents can help their children build business skills with little to no money down. If you have been inspired from this article please leave a comment and consider subscribing to the RSS (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader [look for Weekend Post].