Home > Diversity Teaching, Mission Statements, Stressed Out K-12 > Diversity Teaching | Blaming the Student

Diversity Teaching | Blaming the Student

Photo Credit by frerieke | Leadership Training - Everybody is Equally Huggable

Photo Credit by frerieke | Leadership Training - Everybody is Equally Huggable

“The problem is that they become institutions in themselves, and the bulk of the energy goes to making them better places to work than places to learn.” Halps

Stressed Out K – 12 Education Series 4.0

Google Alerts Rock

Once again my Google Alerts has delivered a gem to my mailbox. This time its Teacher Magazine in a Discussion Forum moderated by Anthony Rebora titled Classroom Management: Blaming the Student?

This past week Teacher Magazine ran an impromptu poll identifying “disruptive students” as their biggest classroom management issue in live chat Managing Difficult Classrooms. Surprised guest Principal Robin Weaver responded, “From my perspective, that ‘blames the student’ when we must be the responsible party (as adults) to figure out how to turn it around.”

Rebora posed a follow up discussion question, “How, in your experience, can teachers and school administrators work together to help children with behavioral problems?”

Experience is Priceless

Like so many educational issues children with behavioral problems will never have a cookie cutter solution. In my experience the best thing you can do with classroom behavioral issues are to learn the language of those acting out and then dare to teach it to difficult administrators. I wish it were easier than that.

Becky Norris posted, Day in and day out, I see the same students in different teachers’ classrooms. In one classroom, the student may be an enormous disruption. In another classroom, the same student is quiet but does not participate or engage with the curriculum. In a third classroom, this same student again is engaged, respectful, even enthusiastic.

Halps poignantly wrote, I agree that we really need to start centering schools on the concept of what they exist for — helping the community raise their children. The problem is that they become institutions in themselves, and the bulk of the energy goes to making them better places to work than places to learn.

P.S. If you have been inspired from this article please consider leaving a comment and subscribing to the RSS feed (top right column) to have future post delivered to your feed reader. Please send your friends to http://laroncarter.com to connect with me on the web.

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: